Sverige projekt Maskrosbarn

Support for children in families with abuse and/or mental illness

Facts

Project partner:
Maskrosbarn

Where:
Stockholm, Sweden

Contact:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

In Sweden, an estimated 500,000 children and young people grow up with at least one parent who struggles with an addiction or mental illness. Many of these children are subjected to violence, sexual abuse and neglect. Many of the children are also taking full responsibility for parents and siblings. Carrying a dark family secret is difficult for these children. Many talk about feeling a lack of love and security. They also express that they are not listened to by authorities, that they do not receive help in time and that there is a lack of support based on their actual needs. The organization Maskrosbarn was founded in 2005 with the ambition to change this. Childhood started working with them after their very first summer camp.

Developing child protection systems and interventions

Childhood´s policy is to invest in new organizations and ideas that address gaps in child protection systems is an important strategy for Childhood. We strongly believe in the power of committed individuals who are convinced that it is possible to create a better and safer society for children. We therefore did not hesitate to collaborate with Maskrosbarn. With long-term support from Childhood, Maskrosbarn has been able to, step by step, develop both the organization, the summer camps and develop a new form of care arrangement for children.

From service provision to systemic change

During our ten yeaars of cooperation with Maskrosbarn, the organization has grown rapidly and today consists of over 20 employees ane around 100 volounteers with activities in Malmö, Stockholm and Gothenburg. Maskrosbarn charges for its services to a number of authorities/municipalities, produces high-profile reports and has become an important voice to raise and communicate children´s experiences. The lecture to a large nuber of decision-makers, prospective and current social workers and regularly called in as experts in government investigations.

Photo: private