Cambodia

Epic Arts Cambodia

Organization: Epic Arts Cambodia
Location: Kampot, Kambodja
Target group: Children with functional variations


Epic Arts Cambodia is an organization that works with children with functional variations and their families, under the motto that all people are valuable and count. Cambodia is a country where many parents, due to lack of knowledge and fear, hide children with functional variations away from the world – not even the neighbors know that they exist; they have never been to school and they have never had friends.

Epic Arts’ foremost purpose is to include and strengthen children and to show them and their closest relatives that they can do whatever they want, if only they receive the right support and environment. When the organization conveys its message, it mainly uses the power of art, giving children and young people with functional variations the chance to sing and dance in music videos or on stage – at a highly artistic level. Epic Arts Cambodia has become world famous for its cover of the Pharell Williams song “Happy,” where they dispel many of the myths about what people with functional variations can and cannot do. Art is also the tool used by Epic Arts to bring children, young people and adults who have functional variations together with those who do not. Some of the organization’s work is paid for by the earnings from its own café and shop as well as theater and dance performances.

Epic Arts also offers various types of training: Some children need preparatory support before they start at a government school or other school; others receive training directly from Epic Arts as they will never be able to attend another school (since other schools are most often not adapted for functional variations).

The project supported by Childhood aims to ensure that children with functional variations have the right to safety and protection in their everyday lives, which for many of them is characterized by mistreatment, violence, abuse and exploitation. Epic Arts wants everyone who works for the organization to learn more about established child protection measures and use this knowledge to reach out to children, their families and others in their community. The project also enables younger children with functional variations (three to five years of age) to attend the Epic Arts center twice a week with their parents, to promote the child’s development and to provide the parents with tips and advice on how to best support their child.

More info: epicarts.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Safe Haven Medical Outreach

Organization: Safe Haven Medical Outreach
Location: Siem Reap, Cambodia
Target group: Children with functional variations


Safe Haven Medical Outreach is a small grassroots organization with five employees who work with children with functional variations and their families. The team comprises a manager (who is also a nurse), a project coordinator with a family support function, a physiotherapist, a social worker and an administrator. The great thing about Safe Haven is that they focus on “the whole child” and have developed an interdisciplinary approach that meets children’s needs for health, rehabilitation, development and social support. This includes a comprehensive assessment of each child and their family, developing an action plan to meet their needs and defining specific goals, along with regular follow-ups to update the goals and monitor progress. This work is done in the children’s homes or at the Safe Haven office. The organization also offers support groups for parents, and accompanies children and parents on visits to the doctor and others. They also cooperate with a local church that provided a tuk-tuk adapted for the disabled, which can transport children in wheelchairs to the doctor, for example. The number of children and families receiving this support increases each year, but it is far from sufficient. Accordingly, Safe Haven has worked actively to build and strengthen this expertise among other players, both governmental and non-governmental, so that ultimately, more children and their families will receive the support and assistance they are entitled to.

Children with special needs are extremely vulnerable in Cambodia. The country has adopted several laws to safeguard their rights, but they are not applied in practice and a de facto welfare state does not exist. Discrimination against children with special needs is widespread and begins in village communities, where the children are often stigmatized and avoided – and are often exposed to mistreatment, violence and abuse, since they are “easy targets.” In most cases, they cannot attend school, as the teachers are not trained or used to including children with functional variations in their lessons, nor are there any adapted classrooms or bathrooms. Even if these did exist, the children would be unable to get to school, as the schools are often located far from villages and school transport does not exist.

Childhood’s support enables Safe Haven to employ and train more staff, increase other organizations’ expertise through training, mentorship and coaching, and engage in coordination and cooperation aimed at reaching out to more children and families and expanding the services offered to them.

More info: safehaven.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

APLE Cambodia

Organization: APLE Cambodia
Location: Siem Reap, Kambodja
Target group: Children at risk of abuse


Our partner APLE Cambodia (Action Pour Les Enfants) was founded in 2003 and works with children who are the victims of sexual abuse by foreign offenders in Cambodia. It runs various programs to protect children who are at risk of becoming victims of crime and provides support to children who are already victims. APLE

• is involved in an investigative collaboration with national and international police personnel and offers training to national law enforcement authorities;
• ensures that legal proceedings in the entire criminal process are suitable for children;
• develops and disseminates guidelines for best practice in supporting victims and their families;
• provides crisis intervention;
• offers emotional support, legal advice and representation for victims and their families;
• runs information campaigns to disseminate knowledge to the people of Cambodia about how they can prevent sexual abuse and exploitation of children;
• operates an online and telephone hotline where the public can give anonymous tips of suspected or actual cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children;
• and supports research, advocacy and awareness-raising activities.

Many APLE employees work in secrecy and take significant risks with their own safety so they can identify vulnerable children and offenders. All members of the team say they do their utmost not to expose themselves to danger and the team works in close cooperation with the police, though sometimes risks are taken to protect children.

More info: aplecambodia.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Mith Samlanh

Organization: Mith Samlanh
Location: Phnom Penh, Kambodja
Target group: Homeless children


Mith Samlanh works with street children and their families, both from a preventive perspective and to reintegrate the children into their families. The organization currently acts as an extended arm of the Cambodian social services in Phnom Penh and the nearby areas with the hope that the Cambodian government will reassume this responsibility.

Mith Samlanh’s field workers regularly visit those areas of the city frequented by the children and families. They revisit the same place several times a week and lay out tarps on the ground to create a space where the children and adolescents can gather. The smallest children get to play and read, teenagers gather to discuss sex and relationships, and young mothers are given advice on how to keep their infants healthy.

The aim is to build trust and then invite the families to come to the organization’s drop-in center, where they are given food, can wash themselves and have the opportunity to talk to someone about the reasons why they ended up on the street. Mith Samlanh also offers children and adolescents opportunities for education, including drug prevention, and reaches out to vulnerable families at risk of ending up on the street.

More info: mithsamlanh.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Children in Families

Organization: Children in Families
Location: Phnom Penh, Kambodja
Target group: At risk children

Children in Families focuses on ensuring and promoting care for vulnerable children in family-based surroundings. Its aim is simply to reduce the number of children in orphanages and primarily to support parents so they do not need to give away their children at all.

Childhood supports the work of Children in Families in emergency health and social care, which may include temporary placement, support for relatives who have the main responsibility for the child or children, and short-term and long-term foster care placement. Children in Families also offers support to parents with disabled children and in this way reduces the risk of the child being abandoned or mistreated in some other way. Support is also provided to orphanages that want to reorganize their operations to become family-based.

More info: childreninfamilies.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

M’lup Russey

Organization: M’lup Russey
Location: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Target group: At risk families

M’lup Russey aims to strengthen families so they can stay together, and to offer alternative placements in a family setting instead of an orphanage for children with no family.

M’lup Russey is one of the main stakeholders involved in the work to change the system for taking care of and supporting children in Cambodia. The organization has supported the government in drawing up new guidelines, developing capacity and monitoring the quality of implemented measures. The organization is also the only one in Cambodia that focuses solely on reuniting families and readjusting children who have lived in orphanages. It acts as a direct decision-maker on issues affecting children in care and their families. It also develops alternatives to orphanages, such as acute foster care placement.

More info: mluprussey.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Angkor Hospital for Children

Organization: Angkor Hospital for Children
Location: Siem Reap, Cambodia
Target group: Abandoned children


Throughout the world, children are abandoned at hospitals. These children are often sent directly to a state orphanage without any attempt to track down their parents or other relatives. And parents are not given any information about where the children are sent, if they survive. This trend was observed by the staff at the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The hospital decided to develop a solution to deal with the often-unnecessary separation of children and parents. It established a social worker unit that offers support to children and parents who arrive at the hospital.

The social worker unit is the first of its kind in Cambodia and has attracted considerable positive attention both nationally and internationally. Childhood supports all of its efforts. Its work includes tracking the families of abandoned children, identifying cases of abuse, and interpreting medical information/diagnoses to ensure that family members understand them. A large share of the unit’s work is about offering psychosocial support to the family if a child is sick. Social workers evaluate whether there is a need for financial support, perhaps to cover travel costs and medicines, and also make home visits. The target group includes the children and families who arrive directly at Angkor Hospital for Children as well as other clinics nearby. Another important aspect of the unit’s work involves networking, cooperation and collaboration with other players so that more children and families can receive the support and help they need.

More info: angkorhospital.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Komar Rikreay Association

Organization: Komar Rikreay Association
Location: Battambang, Cambodia
Target group: Homeless children


The Komar Rikreay Association strives to provide development opportunities for street children and children exposed to trafficking. Many children who have been left behind by migrating parents or have become the victims of child trafficking and been sent back to Cambodia from Thailand wind up in Battambang, which is on the two countries’ border. With Childhood’s support, Komar Rikreay ensures the children are provided with safe accommodation, and the care and support they need. To minimize the risk of the children once again becoming the victims of trafficking, the organization offers them various education programs as well as counselling and therapy. Komar Rikreay also works actively to locate the parents and relatives of children who have lost contact with their families. The family support program empowers and supports parents in their parental roles, primarily in terms of talking about difficult experiences. It also includes initiatives that boost the family’s ability to provide for themselves, since poverty is often the main underlying reason for the disintegration of the family. Children whose parents have emigrated can live with foster families who are trained and supported by Komar Rikreay.

More info: komarrikreaycambodia.wordpress.com


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

This Life Cambodia

Organization: This Life Cambodia
Location: Siem Reap, Cambodia
Target group: Children leaving orphanages and families with imprisoned members


This Life Cambodia runs several projects, two of which are supported by Childhood. The first project provides support to children with a family member in prison and to children and young people who are in prison themselves. Children and young people are often treated as adults by the Cambodian legal system and can remain in custody for some time without going to trial. This Life Cambodia has therefore created a support program that enables families to keep in touch during imprisonment, partly as a way to make it easier when they are reunited after prison. Young people in prison attend regular courses and are offered vocational training in mechanics or electronics as well as support to start their own business and/or find a job when they leave prison.

Families with a parent in prison are often faced with the difficult situation of surviving on a single wage. This Life Cambodia therefore provides emergency help when necessary as well as minor financial support to open up a store, sell food or conduct other activities that can help the family to support itself in the future. Siblings receive help with school supplies to ensure that they are not taken out of school to help provide for the family.

The other project that Childhood supports ensures that children who leave orphanages are welcomed by society. The number of children in orphanages in Cambodia has increased rapidly over the past decade, even though three-quarters of the children have at least one parent still alive. This increase is partly the result of well-meaning organizations, companies, volunteers and individuals that donate large sums of money to orphanages, instead of investing in a system that identifies vulnerable children and families at an early stage and provides them with support to continue living together as a family. The project is a joint venture between three organizations and focuses on reversing this trend and, in the long term, ensuring that children grow up with their families whenever possible. It provides direct support to orphanages that want to change their way of working as well as contributing to the development of a model for safe reunification of children with their parents, research and early support to children and families. The project is scheduled to continue for six years and will draw up guidelines for de-institutionalization, which will then be presented to the Cambodian government.

More info: thislifecambodia.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

First Step

Organization: First Step
Location: Siem Reap, Cambodia
Target group: Children who have been victims of abuse


First Step offers support to children who are victims of sexual abuse, with a particular focus on boys and young men. First Step is the first organization in Cambodia to highlight the vulnerability of boys and their need for support. The organization’s main goal is a long-term collaboration with local authorities, organizations, families and individuals, centered on children and young people.

First Step works directly with abused children and young people through information and education efforts, therapy and crisis intervention. It also offers support to other family members when abuse has taken place, primarily to make them understand that it is not the fault of the child that the abuse occurred, the types of help and support he needs and where this help can be obtained. The organization also talks to families about how to handle cultural and social stigmatization. First Step’s support efforts also include coaching of social workers at other organizations who are to identify and provide the necessary initial support and help. In addition, First Step works with children and young people who show sexually harmful behavior, to prevent abuse. First Step is part of a network of organizations in Cambodia that receive support from Childhood. The aim of the network is primarily to collaborate on individual cases, increase competence and work proactively and responsively toward the young people in the target group and their families.

Childhood is now supporting another project with the First Step organization. The project is based on a regional partnership between four organizations in the Philippines, India, Cambodia and Nepal, and aims to investigate sexual abuse of boys and damaging sexual behavior among boys who have been exposed to sexual abuse (from adults or other children). The overall objective is to improve conditions for boys who are victims, so that more dare to speak out and make reports, thereby making it possible to give them the help they are entitled to (and, in turn, be able to improve the support and measures that already exist). The survey includes

  • identifying shared and context-specific knowledge of sexual abuse against boys and damaging sexual behavior

  • identifying activities that have proven effective

  • further developing activities that prevent and counteract sexual abuse and damaging sexual behavior in boys and increasing knowledge and understanding of this among children, young people and adults

  • increasing knowledge and understanding among decision-makers and those who work with these matters in practice to ensure they understand and implement the changes required, thereby enabling sexual abuse to be stopped and damaging sexual behavior among boys to be prevented as far as possible.


More info: first-step-cambodia.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

M’Lop Tapang

Organization: M’Lop Tapang
Location: Sihanoukville, Cambodia
Target group: Children with parents who are addicts


Childhood’s partner organization M’lop Tapang is active in the tourist destination of Sihanoukville. Combined with extreme poverty, the rapidly expanding tourism in Sihanoukville has led to many children and their families coming here in the hope of a better future. Many of them wind up on the streets or living in slum-like areas, or in the entertainment and sex industry, which is closely associated with tourism.

M’lop Tapang was formed in 2003 by a group of committed individuals who wanted to help boys sleeping on the beach at night; today it reaches 5,000 children and their families each year. The organization has developed a holistic program to support vulnerable children and families, and offers outreach activities, a drop-in center, help to reintegrate children and young people living and working on the street with their families or relatives, education, vocational training and help to reintegrate children into schools. The organization also helps families find a means to provide for themselves and gives financial support in times of crisis. M’lop Tapang has a successful drug prevention and rehabilitation program aimed at young people and parents.

For six years, Childhood has mainly provided support to M’lop Tapang’s family support and drug prevention programs. Now we are supporting a new project – building up Cambodia’s first treatment center for alcohol and drug addicts. The target groups are mothers who work in the sex industry, and children and young people whose parents are addicts. Substance abuse, particularly of various types of narcotics, is a huge problem in Cambodia. In recent years, this has been highlighted by the government, whose response is to arrest many addicts. In Sihanoukville, where new casinos are essentially being built every week, a close relationship can be seen between tourism, the entertainment and sex industry, and the surge in addiction. The children of parents who are addicts in this industry bear witness to dreadful living situations, facing mistreatment, violence, abuse, exploitation and, in particular, a constant sense of danger.  Our project provides support to these children, young people and their families, both individually and together. The aim is to gain greater knowledge and competence regarding the “target group” and the design and building of the treatment center, and to provide direct support based on the needs of the children and their families.

More info: mloptapang.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

USA

Legal services for Children

Organization: Legal services for Children
Location: San Francisco, USA
Target group: At risk children


In order to stabilize the lives of children and youth and help them realize their full potential, Legal Services for Children (LSC) provides free legal and social services to children and youth in need. LSC’s in-house attorneys and social workers, as well as the organization’s pro bono attorneys, provide every client with comprehensive, holistic services to enable the children to achieve safety and stability, and avoid unnecessary placement in the foster care and juvenile justice systems. Each year, LSC serves over 2,500 children and provides comprehensive representation to approximately 600 youth.

Childhood supports the development of ARC (Advocacy, Relationship, Coordination) to enhance agency response to child trauma and part of establishing services at the Center for Youth Wellness.

More info: www.lcs-sf.org


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

Peer Health Exchange

Organization: Peer Health Exchange
Location: New York and San Francisco, USA
Target group: High school students


Peer Health Exchange (PHE) was founded in 1999 by six Yale undergraduates, who began teaching health workshops in New Haven public schools in order to fill the gap left by an underfunded, understaffed district health program. PHE train college student volunteers to teach a comprehensive health curriculum in public high schools that lack health education.

Childhood has helped PHE educate thousands of high school students on a comprehensive health curriculum which includes sexual and reproductive health, practicing thoughtful decision-making, learning to communicate effectively with family members and peers, and accessing health resources in the area. Integrated into the curriculum are group conversations, offering the students a safe space to discuss some of the more sensitive issues faced in daily life. This curriculum aligns with Childhood’s efforts in reducing childhood trauma and preventing unintended teen pregnancy by ensuring teenagers have knowledge and skills around sexual health, healthy relationships, and consent so that they can make informed and empowered decisions.

Childhood USA will continue to support the expansion of PHE’s behavioral health curriculum, increase the numbers of volunteers, establish new chapters at area universities and new sites (Staten Island, San Jose University) and adapt programs to serve young people during after school and out-of-school time with the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Peninsula.

More info: peerhealthexchange.org


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

The Bridge for Youth

Organization: The Bridge for Youth
Location: Minneapolis/St Paul, USA
Target group: At risk youth


For over 34 years, The Bridge has worked with youth and families in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis/St. Paul, providing immediate shelter and safety for youth in crisis, with caring and experienced counselors to help them find solutions to the difficulties they face. The Bridge works with both parents and youth, helping them resolve family conflicts and rediscover their common ground. The Bridge helps young people reconnect with their families, schools and communities; it strengthens families and helps prevent youth homelessness. The Bridge’s services are free and confidential, and available 24 hours a day. Childhood has supported The Bridge to incorporate a comprehensive program to manage and treat youth who presents with sexual abuse trauma or those who have been victims of commercial sexual exploitation.

In recent years, the Bridge has been leveraging technology to help runaway and homeless youth, specifically through two channels: the Text4Help (T4H) and the YSNMN.org app. The goal is to improve street affected youth’s access to shelters and services. The YSMN.org app is also used by another Childhood project, YouthLink.


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

Safe and Sound

Organization: Safe and Sound
Location: San Francisco, USA
Target group: Children at risk of abuse


Safe and Sound is dedicated to the prevention of child abuse and neglect, the promotion of healthy families, and the mental health of children.  The goal is to ensure that all children grow up in a loving, nurturing, and caring family in which every child can thrive to meet his or her full potential. Safe and Sound believes that prevention and early intervention are keys to making this happen, by reducing the risk factors that are associated with abuse and neglect, and promoting the protective factors that are known to mitigate those risks.

More recently, Safe and Sound made headlines with their ground-breaking report on “The Economics of Child Abuse: A Study of San Francisco”, which demonstrated the cost of child abuse. In SF alone, the annual cost amounted to 301.6 million dollars.

More info: www.safeandsound.org


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

Mass Kids

Organization: Legal services for Children
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Target group: At risk children


Massachusetts Citizens for Children (MassKids) is the oldest state-based child advocacy organization in the country. Their mission is to improve the lives of the state’s most vulnerable children and youth through advocacy by concerned citizens. Since the mid-70s, it has been committed to preventing the abuse and neglect of our state’s children.

The project Childhood supports, Pledge to Prevent, is an online social media campaign whose goals are to empower individuals across the country to be educated about Child Sexual Abuse. Individuals are encouraged to take a stand as learners, educators, safe community promoters or movement builders.

More info: pledgetoprevent.org


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

The New York Foundling

Organization: The New York Foundling
Location: New York City, USA
Target group: Children ages 8-10


Childhood supports New York Foundlin´g Child Abuse Prevention (CAPP) Program workshops specifically designed for third and fourth graders. The workshops provide child abuse prevention education and empowerment to elementary school children. CAPP teaches children about physical and sexual abuse prevention. Following the workshop, children are provided with a supportive and comfortable opportunity to speak about any abuse related questions or disclosures.

More info: www.nyfoundling.org


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

Safe Horizon

Organization: Safe Horizon
Location: New York City, USA
Target group: Victims of child abuse, domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, and human trafficking


Safe Horizon (New York, NY) is the nation’s leading victim assistance organization and seeks to empower victims to move from crisis to confidence through case management, advocacy, guidance and support. Safe Horizon offers services through 18 programs at more than 50 sites throughout New York City, and its target groups include victims of child abuse, domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, human trafficking, and other crimes.

In 2018, Safe Horizon leverage its nearly 30 years of experience providing evidence-based, trauma-informed treatment for child victims of crime and abuse at its Brooklyn-based mental health Counseling Center to provide an improved approach to children who replicate the sexual abuse that was perpetrated on them with other children. Safe Horizon uses Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT), a widely-disseminated evidence-based model for treating children with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), for use with children who reenact sexual abuse.


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

Youth Link

Organization: Youth Link
Location: Minneapolis, USA
Target group: At risk children


YouthLink works to fill the critical need for specialized intervention and prevention services to address the complex issues surrounding the sexual exploitation of youth. As a recognized leader among nonprofits, YouthLink serves the homeless and at-risk youth in the Twin Cities of Minnesota.


Contact person at Childhood:
info@childhood-usa.org

South Africa

Clowns Without Borders

Organization: Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Target group: Children and families in crises


Clowns Without Borders South Africa (CWBSA) is a non-profit organization based in Cape Town, South Africa. Together with the Mikhulu Trust, it works to develop and spread Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH), an initiative led by individuals from the WHO, UNICEF and several universities. PLH comprises three parental programs aimed at parents with children of various ages, with the principal objective of preventing violence against children. The parental programs are evidence-based and have been implemented in several countries in Africa. In addition to working with PLH, CWBSA also has clowns and performers who make special appearances to provide psychosocial support to children and families affected by crises, such as those in refugee camps or in poor areas that are subject to violence.

The project aims to develop a model for how to spread the parental programs and help make grassroots organizations and vulnerable areas self-sufficient when it comes to continuing to train group leaders, while also providing guidance to make it possible to reach as many children and families as possible.  Another of Childhood’s partner organizations in South Africa, the Seven Passes Initiative, is already working with PLH’s parental programs.

More info: cwbsa.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Children’s Institute

Organization: Children’s Institute
Location: Kapstaden, Sydafrika
Target group: Children who are victims of abuse


Children’s Institute is a research unit that is part of the University of Cape Town. Its mission is to conduct child-centered research, teaching and development aimed at improving the lives of children. Work by the unit contributes to policies, legislation and measures that promote equality, and improvements to conditions and the realization of rights for all children in South Africa.
The overall objective of the project is to improve services for children who are the victims of abuse and to stop re-traumatization by developing a multidisciplinary model. The project will initially focus on finding the Barnahus children’s house model that is best suited for implementation and will offer the best results in South Africa and the system in place there. During the second phase of the project, the plan is to offer specialist training to all police officers, social workers and healthcare staff who work with child abuse in order to start a pilot model in two test districts. The pilot project will then run for 18 months.

The target group for the project is children who are victims of sexual abuse. A national study from 2016 found that one in three children in South Africa has been the victim of some form of sexual abuse before the age of 18.


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Waves for Change

Organization: Waves for Change
Location: Kapstaden, Sydafrika
Target group: At risk children


Children who grow up in vulnerable areas often experience several traumas, as violence is so prevalent in their everyday lives. Through Waves for Change, children can take part in a surf club, where they not only learn to master the waves but are also provided with tools to cope with their feelings and build healthy relationships. The aim of the surfing program is to attract independent young people at risk, who would otherwise be difficult to reach, and to use surfing to teach the children to feel connected to their bodies, which can help to reduce symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety. The project combines surfing with additional psychosocial components and also includes home and school visits, parent education and mentorship.

More info: waves-for-change.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Seven Passes

Organization: Seven Passes
Location: George, South Africa
Target group: At risk families


The Seven Passes Initiative was founded in 2008 in Touwsranten, a small town in South Africa’s Western Cape Province. The organization grew from shared concerns about the increasingly aggressive behavior among the community’s adolescents, high levels of school absenteeism and drop-out rates, and a desire to turn this trend around.  The initiative acts to reduce poverty in the long term by raising the level of education in the community. The organization offers help with homework and other educational activities, including sports, music and drama.

The project offers four different parental support programs: for newborns, children aged up to two, children aged two to nine and for teenagers. The program focuses on five key areas to support children’s development and well-being: social skills, building relationships, learning how to handle emotions and self-control, learning appropriate behavior and boundaries as well as cognitive skills, such as language and reasoning. The objective of the project is to achieve a change to warmer, more positive and more consistent parenting among the population of Touwsranten, and to thereby reduce the risk of child abuse in the community. This is being achieved through a parenting program in combination with a social activity group, which encourages residents of the community to prepare small projects to improve the area, primarily in terms of child safety and related in various ways to the prevention of violence. The project’s target group includes all adults with custody of one or more children in Touwsranten along with their children (304 families with 570 children). The project is being followed up and evaluated by the University of Cape Town and the Institute for Security Studies.

More info: sevenpasses.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Etafeni Children’s Project

Organization: Etafeni
Location: Nyanga, South Africa
Target group: Children and families in crises


Nyanga is one of Cape Town’s poorest and most violent areas. Etafeni Centre operates a preschool and after-school care program, and has worked with HIV prevention for many years. Childhood finances the organization’s Children’s Safety Project, which provides support in the form of trauma debriefing and counseling, home visits and court preparation for children who are victims of sexual abuse in Nyanga. The project also focuses on preventive activities, offering training for teachers in how to identify and talk to children who they suspect have been subjected to violence or abuse and speaking to students about children’s rights, sexual abuse and what to do if they are ever a victim themselves. Many students have later spoken with their teachers about what they have gone through and have been able to receive additional help and protection.

More info: etafeni.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Philisa Abafazi Bethu

Organization: Philisa Abafazi Bethu
Location: Lavender Hill, South Africa
Target group: At risk families


Philisa Abafazi Bethu is located in Lavender Hill, one of Cape Town’s most violent neighborhoods. For a long time, gang wars have made the area unsafe. Philisa Abafazi Bethu offers a safe refuge for women and children in Lavender Hill. Children learn about their rights, can participate in music therapy and take part in excursions, camps, support groups and counseling. Parents are involved through workshops, focus groups and parent meetings.

Philisa Abafazi Bethu also operates an emergency safe house for abused women and their children. Childhood’s ongoing project with Philisa Abafazi Bethu also focuses on training and supporting a number of mothers who are on call to take care of children who have been abandoned or taken into care, until such time as the social services can take over responsibility. Philisa will also conduct a one-year project focused on working holistically and intensively with ten families to break the cycle of violence and to improve the circumstances of the children and their families.

More info: philisaabafazi.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Germany

Das Nets

Organization: Das Nets e.V.
Location: Weilheim, Germany
Target group: Children who have been abused

Children who have been sexually abused are very often traumatized. In order to process the trauma and reduce feelings of anxiety, panic attacks and self-harming behavior, they need professional support. “Das Netz e.V.” (“The Network”) was founded in 1992, bringing together the expertise of educational specialists, theologians, doctors and psychotherapists. In January 2015, they started an outreach center in Weilheim, Bavaria. The children they encounter have experienced sexual violence and sexual abuse, and are often brought to the center by their parents. With support from Childhood, counseling is provided for 45 children and 60 parents every year.

Das Netz offers counseling to the children and through that support helps them regain control of their lives, after the abuse. They also provide counseling for the parents, teachers and school and pre-school staff.  Focus is also put on networking and discussing with local, media and raising awareness to the issue in their training classes courses. Another aspect of their work includes cooperating with other relevant stakeholders such as specialist staff from the authorities such as the Child Welfare Office and medical, therapeutic or legal sectors. Efficient cooperation with relevant experts is of great importance as this ensures that the children receive the help they need as quickly as possible.
More info: www.das-netz-ev.de


Contact person at Childhood:
Andrea Möhringer
andrea.moehringer@childhood.org


E-Learning Module for Young Volunteers

Organization: Evangelische Jugend in Bayern
Location: Bavaria, Germany
Target group: Children at risk of abuse

The Protestant Youth Organization in Bavaria (EJB) has been working to prevent sexual violence in the region for many years. Their manual “Bei uns nicht?!” (“Not Here?!”) was created to provide guidelines and support for the practical work. Staff and persons of trust now regularly attend training courses and events on child protection.

The project Childhood supports is digital learning module for youth volunteers and young adults who act as mentors and guides during church leisure activities, youth camps, and other events. The e-learning module is an easy way for youth leaders to gain knowledge in the field of prevention – from their own computers, tablets or smart phones – and makes them better equipped to protect children in the church from sexual assault or violence.

The e-learning module is the second part in the church´s training program on child protection.  The long-term is to make it available to all providers of youth and leisure activities.

More info: www.ejb.de


Contact person at Childhood:
Andrea Möhringer
andrea.moehringer@childhood.org

Trauma-Focused Intervention for Unaccompanied Minors

Organization: Trauma-Focused Intervention for Unaccompanied Minors
Location: Ulm, Germany
Target group: Refugee children


There has been a major increase in the number of refugees arriving in Germany over the last years, and a significant number of them are unaccompanied minors. Many of the children have been forced to leave their parents in their countries of origin or have been separated from them while on the move.

Unaccompanied minors are at increased risk of being sexually abused and need a high level of protection. As of today, the German social system do not provide any mental healthcare for these often traumatized children. Childhood therefore supports a program for trauma-focused intervention for unaccompanied minors that initiated by a working group for psychotherapeutic research and behavioral medicine at the clinic for pediatric and youth psychiatry/psychotherapy at the University of Ulm. The program is being developed and implemented in collaboration with various authorities responsible for taking care of unaccompanied minors and thus can contribute with great expertise in the this field.

The main target group are 300 unaccompanied minors who live in child welfare services facilities. The program´s activities are group based. The group format is helpful because the experienced can be shared with others and thus makes the children feel  that they are not alone with their traumas. They can also learn from each other (about dealing with challenges like living in a foreign country away from their families, or with concentration, attention and sleeping difficulties). The central objective of the program is for the children to create a trauma narrative that enables them to reflect on their life on the move and the new life in Germany.

* 441,899 people applied for asylum in Germany in 2015. More than 50 percent of them were younger than 18. 
More info: University of Ulm

Contact person at Childhood:
Andrea Möhringer
andrea.moehringer@childhood.org

Childhood-Haus

Organization: Universitätsklinik und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin Leipzig
Location: Leipzig, Germany
Target group: Children who have been abused

Child protection is an integral part of the medical services at the University Clinic of Leipzig outpatient clinic for children and young people. An interdisciplinary child protection group with staff from a range of professional backgrounds has been working there since 1999. In 2012, a child protection outpatient clinic was created within the framework of the child protection group.

Around 100 to 150 minors facing child protection and abuse issues visit and are treated at the University Clinic of Leipzig every year. The number of children and young people who visit the clinic with signs of endangerment of child welfare caused by physical, sexual or emotional abuse or neglect is growing constantly in Leipzig. This is due to the greater number of preschool and school-age children, the larger number of children in families receiving welfare support (Hartz IV recipients), the increased number of refugee children and the ongoing issue of drug use.

Following the Scandinavian Barnahus children’s houses (Children´s Advocacy Centers) model, The University Clinic, with Childhood´s support and funding, is currently setting up a child-friendly facility that provides support in (suspected) cases of sexual abuse. This support is based on interdisciplinary cooperation between appropriate professional groups, all under one roof. The multidisciplinary team works together to provide appropriate support for children. Interviews with children are kept to a minimum and are carried out in a child-friendly environment. Victim support and suitable care are also coordinated. An important aspect of the Barnahus is the interview room, where children under court supervision are interviewed by a specially trained psychologist. Additional professionals sit in an adjacent room and are connected to the interview room via visual acoustic technology, thus allowing them to ask questions of the child being interviewed.

More info: www.childhood-haus.de


Contact person at Childhood:
Andrea Möhringer
andrea.moehringer@childhood.org

Welcome to Soccer

Organization: Refugio Bremen e.V.
Location: Germany
Target group: Children who have been abused

The non-profit organization Refugio Bremen has operated a psychosocial treatment center for refugees and survivors of torture since 1989. Refugio set up the first project to promote therapy and advocacy for child refugees in Bremen with the support of the Childhood. Their goal is to provide professional, sustainable and financially secure treatment.

The target group consists of child and youth refugees from different backgrounds who are in need of protection. Most of the refugees fled Syria because of the civil war or came from neighboring countries, where they had initially sought refuge before having to flee to Germany.

The goal of the project “Welcome to soccer” is to sustainably improve psychosocial healthcare for child and youth refugees. Soccer training will also be part of the support work of Refugio, serving to create a connection with the refugees and facilitating the provision of therapeutic treatment. These specialized services take place within a safe therapeutic framework and are run by trained and qualified male and female staff and volunteer trainers accompanied by a therapeutic specialist. Interpreters are provided as required.

The participants will also be able to access other support services and information, making it easier for them to stabilize psychologically and socially and thus feel at home more quickly in Germany, helping them gain the strength to begin processing their traumatic experiences and facilitating the process of integration.There are three to five weekly training groups, including one for girls. The training is held at suitable sporting or training facilities, like those of the club SV Werder Bremen. The scope of spoken therapeutic work is limited during the soccer training and therefore largely takes place at their treatment center.

More info: www.refugio-bremen.de


Contact person at Childhood:
Andrea Möhringer
andrea.moehringer@childhood.org

Ukraine

Fulcrum

Organization: Fulcrum
Location: Ukraine
Target group: LGBTQ+ persons

Fulcrum works to ensure that all LGBTQ+ persons have the same rights and obligations as everyone else in Ukraine. Due to homophobia and discrimination, young LGBTQ persons in Ukraine run a higher risk of being subjected to violence and sexual exploitation as well as suffering from mental illness. The goal of the project is for young LGBTQ persons in Kiev to receive high-quality and non-discriminatory help at the city’s family and youth centers. The centers’ employees will learn to work better with such vulnerable groups as young LGBTQ people. Communication channels, including online alternatives, will be developed. Fulcrum will also establish networks comprising various organizations, who collectively can better reach out and help the target groups. The project also includes activities with parents to help them provide support for their children.

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Liga

Organization: Liga
Location: Odessa and Kiev
Target group: LGBTQ+ persons

The goal of the project is for young LGBTQ people in Odessa and Kiev to receive assistance from school psychologists. School psychologists will undergo training to be able to meet and help young LGBTQ people in a supportive and non-discriminatory manner. The project will also provide the target audience with consultations online or by phone.
More info: liga.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Partnership for Every Child

Organization: Partnership for Every Child
Location: Ukraine
Target group: At risk children

With help from Childhood, Partnership for Every Child has developed a model where children in acute need of shelter are placed with a short-term foster family. A number of regions have adopted the model, which is now also funded by local authorities. In those regions where the model has yet to be introduced, children are placed in hospitals and institutions pending formal decisions by the authorities on whether the children should return to their families or be placed in care. Almost all of the children that have been placed with a short-term foster family have avoided ending up in an institution, and have either returned to their families, been adopted or been placed with a long-term foster family. In addition to developing the short-term foster family model, the project also introduced necessary legislative changes and funding mechanisms.

Other children, including those whose parents suddenly pass away or require emergency hospital care, will now be able to avoid being placed in an orphanage. It will also be possible for the large group children who are currently living as internal refugees after being sent away by their parents due to the crisis in eastern Ukraine to legally be placed in the temporary care of relatives. The project aims to educate trainers who, in turn, will prepare hundreds of short-term foster families across Ukraine. The social services are working in parallel with the local authorities to recruit families and to change routines to ensure children are no longer placed in institutions, and to build up support for vulnerable families.
More info: p4ec.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Blaho

Organization: Blaho
Location: Uzhgorod, Ukraine
Target group: At risk groups

Blaho was started in 2003 and initially offered mostly practical and material support for vulnerable groups in western Ukraine (Transcarpathia). Blaho works with the most vulnerable groups in the area, namely Roma children and their families. The organization helps them gain access to healthcare and housing and, since 2014, with the right to education. The majority of Roma in Transcarpathia live below the poverty line and most have dropped out of school. Many live in slums where violence, addiction and unemployment is widespread.

One of the key factors when it comes to integrating into society and obtaining a better future is to compete school education, but for many children, discrimination, stigma, language barriers and a lack of support from home means they drop out of school very early, which is particularly true for girls. Few children from the Roma population go to preschool, partly because of the discrimination they are subjected to, but costs and inadequate language skills also have a strong impact. There are no preschools with specialist competence in Roma issues in Uzhgorod (where about 5,000 Roma live).

Using financing from Childhood, Blaho established a preschool unit for Roma children in April 2014. In the first six months, 22 children attended. Today, 40 children attend the unit and Blaho works with 50 parents.

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Nepal

Kumundini

Organization: Kumundini
Location: Katmandu, Nepal
Target group: At risk women and children

Kumudini is an organization that was recently founded by a group of professionals and individuals, who all work or have worked in various preventive and responsive capacities with women and children exposed to sexual abuse. They all felt that a substantial need existed to establish an emergency clinic with a short-term shelter (20 beds) for girls exposed to sexual abuse, or in danger of sexual abuse, because of the unavailability of such help in Kathmandu at that time.

Childhood is Kumudini’s largest donor and our help has enabled the establishment of this emergency clinic. Kumudini works closely with social workers, the police, lawyers, and other officials and organizations. The focus is on providing psychosocial counseling and therapy to vulnerable girls, and on working together with their immediate families and other relatives to achieve successful reintegration – a considerable amount of the team’s time is spent on ensuring the girls’ well-being when they return home. Despite being a relatively new operation, Kumudini already takes in more girls than it has resources to help. If this model proves successful, the hope is that similar emergency clinics will be established in more locations across Nepal.

Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Asha Nepal

Organization: Asha Nepal
Location: Katmandu, Nepal
Target group: Women and children who are victims of human trafficking

Asha Nepal supports women and children in Kathmandu who have been the victims of human trafficking. The organization also works to prevent more women and children from ending up in the sex industry in Nepal and India. It also helps women and children who have been subjected to domestic violence, rape or other forms of sexual abuse, are living with HIV/AIDS or have been forced into child labor.

Childhood supports all areas of Asha Nepal’s operations. With Childhood’s support, the organization has developed a long-term support program for children and mothers who are rescued from trafficking and return to Nepal, often highly traumatized. Asha Nepal supports them by providing education, job-training, therapy, employment and school for the children as well as by reuniting families. While many other organizations working with trafficking survivors in Nepal only offer the mothers and children separate places at institutions – entailing a great risk that the family will permanently disintegrate – Asha Nepal applies another approach: the children and their mothers are kept together. Asha Nepal also works actively with friends and family, who often treat trafficking survivors very poorly when they return to their home village.

More info: asha-nepal.org

Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Welcome to My Yard

Organization: Welcome to My Yard
Location: Katmandu, Nepal
Target group: Youth and Families living on the streets

Welcome to My Yard works with and on behalf of children, adolescents and young families who live and work on the streets. The organization’s objective is to reduce risks, increase safety and improve protection from abuse, exploitation and neglect. It also aims to improve access to education and encourage young people to start their own business operations and thereby help them to achieve their potential.

Welcome to My Yard offers outreach activities targeting newborn children, adolescents and young families, and provides a feeling of security through its familiar presence. It also runs a drop-in center that acts as a neutral meeting place, which is also open to children and mother groups, where families are offered a time out from life on the streets. The older children are offered help with homework and learn to make food. The project also provides opportunities for schooling for adolescents and young families, and gives them a chance to obtain an education and gain work experience at the organization’s own social business activities.

More info: welcometomyyard.com


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Shakti Milan Samaj

Organization: Shakti Milan Samaj
Location: Katmandu, Nepal
Target group: HIV-positive trafficking survivors

Shakti Milan Samaj was founded in 2006 by a group of HIV-positive trafficking survivors. Founder Natisara Rai (Goma) is a well-known person in Nepal and the first to publicly announce that she is HIV positive.  Shakti Milan Samaj provides support to women and children who are HIV positive or live with an HIV-positive family member. It also works to increase knowledge and raise awareness of these issues in Nepal. It runs an emergency clinic for HIV-positive women, which has treated a total of about 1,000 children and women. Some 140 children visit the emergency center each year and stay for about one month.

In Nepal, approximately 49,000 people are living with HIV and AIDS.  HIV-positive people are still highly stigmatized and discriminated against. Many HIV-positive children are forced to leave school and adults often lose their jobs if they are open about their health. More than half of Shakti Milan Samaj’s clients have lost one or both of their parents to AIDS. Most of the children live with single, impoverished mothers.

The project supported by Childhood concentrates on strengthening children’s education and health and on increasing awareness of the issue.  One important part of this work is to strengthen the relationship between parents and children. Parents are given communication training where they learn to talk to their children and to come closer to them by using simple words to describe difficult things and feelings.  Children learn to talk to their parents about their concerns and to dare to ask questions, and are provided with tools to cope with stress and frustration. Shakti Milan Samaj also works to change attitudes and norms by visiting schools to present information and talk about what it is like to live with HIV/AIDS.
More info: shaktimilan.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Voice of Children

Organization: VoC
Location: Katmandu, Nepal
Target group: Youth living on the streets

Voice of Children (VoC) works from a holistic perspective to protect, boost, rehabilitate and reintegrate children and young people who live and/or work on the streets in Nepal. It has created a work method called the “ladder model” that illustrates its approach: protect/empower, rehabilitate and reintegrate. This model is unique in its field, as it covers all the steps that can be used to respectfully motivate and support children and young people to become part of a family and of society again, and to leave life on the streets behind. The model is also used to support children and young people who would like to change their lives but who fall back to a life on the streets.

Reaching out to family networks is just as important as working directly with children and young people. VoC focuses on preventive measures to strengthen families and minimize the risk that children and young people will end up on the streets. It also identifies, trains and supports foster families or community accommodation facilities for teenagers who cannot or do not want to return to their families. Another important part of the organization’s work is to provide information about sexual abuse and ensure that children and young people who are victims of abuse receive the support they need. Childhood supports this holistic perspective and provides extra support for the work focused on preventive measures and reuniting families and/or integration into society.
More info: voiceofchildren.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Thailand

Step Ahead Development Foundation

Organization: SADF
Location: Thailand
Target group: At risk families


Their main goal is to support and strengthen families so that they remain together and thereby ensure children’s rights to safety and protection. SADF also conducts preschool activities for children aged from one to five years old from highly vulnerable families (which is unique, as most children in Asia begin preschool at the age of three). On a national level, SADF plays an active role in highlighting the problems surrounding orphanages and the fact that a majority of children in orphanages are neither orphans nor in need of protection but rather are usually placed in orphanages for poverty-related reasons, thus breaching the children’s right to their parents.

Read more: stepahead.org

Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Friends International Thailand

Organization: Friends International Thailand
Location: Aranyaprathet, Thailand
Target group: At risk children


Friends International Thailand works with and on behalf of at-risk children and young people. Families and older youths are offered vocational training, micro loans or an opportunity to work at home producing products that Friends International sells. It also runs a staffed hotline for urgent cases.

Read more: friends-international.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

One Sky Foundation

Organization: One Sky Foundation
Location: Sangkhlaburi, Thailand
Target group: At risk families


One Sky, one of our project partners in Thailand, provides support to vulnerable families and children in a difficult-to-access area along the border with Myanmar. In this area, there are essentially no social networks for families. Poverty and discrimination have contributed to many of the area’s children living in 17 unregistered orphanages, despite having at least one living parent.

Childhood is One Sky’s largest donor and we support the majority of the organization’s initiatives. Among other actions, One Sky provides support to at-risk families by proactively reaching out to them in the villages and ensuring they receive help with everything from making a living, food and transportation to education and therapy. One Sky provides support to at-risk families by reaching out to them in the villages and ensuring they receive help with everything from making a living, food and transportation to school uniforms and therapy.

One Sky provides support to at-risk families by reaching out to them in the villages and ensuring they receive help with everything from making a living, food and transportation to school uniforms and therapy.  The objective moving forward is to create a regional system that ensures children are not unnecessarily placed into care without having previously tried other measures. Another objective is to build a foster family program for children who are unable to remain with their birth families.

Read more: oneskyfoundation.org

Contact person at Childhood:
Åsa Olsson
asa.olsson@childhood.org

Brazil

Safe Online Surfing Initiative

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: Safe Online Surfing Initiative
Location: Brazil
Target group: At risk children


The program focuses on the protection of children and adolescents against online abuse and pornography via information and communication technology, and the distribution of the handbook Navegar com Segurança [Safe Online Surfing], released in 2006. The publication is intended for parents and educators, offering guidelines to prevent online abuse and the spread of child and adolescent pornography online. 900,000 printed copies, besides the digital version, have been downloaded from Childhood Brasil’s website. The handbook’s third edition was released in 2012. The project actions include conference and events’ attendance, strategies for prevention and protection of children and adolescents on the Internet with Brazilian companies and partnership with Google for online safety content of the internet.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

The Infrastructure Program

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: The Infrastructure Program
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children who are at risk of abuse

Despite their importance to the economy, major infrastructure projects can have negative impacts on their surrounding populations, including children, who are the most vulnerable group. The program mobilizes governments, companies and civil society to work together on intersectoral actions whose main purpose is to prevent children being sexually abused during large projects such as infrastructure, mobility, new industries, or hotel operations.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

Protecting Children at Major Sporting Events

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: Protecting Children at Major Sporting Events
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children who are at risk of abuse

Childhood Brazil has worked intensively with increasing child protection before, during and following major sporting events. These efforts intensified ahead of the Olympic Games in Rio, when the Rio 2016 Organizing Committee invited civil society organizations to look at putting on a more sustainable Games by adding child rights protection to the Games’ sustainability management plan. A partnership was established when the Organizing Committee invited Childhood Brazil to coordinate efforts with organizing the various national bodies that work to prevent violence against children.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

The Tourism Program

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: The Tourism Program
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children who are at risk of abuse

The Brazilian Tourism Program focuses on popular tourist destinations in the north east of Brazil, using collaborative projects and the consolidation of public policies in order to prevent and fight the sexual exploitation of children. Over the past ten years, the partnership with the Atlantica Hotels chain has become a model for helping the hotel sector to prevent and confront sexual violence against children.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

On The Right Track

Organization: Tjejzonen
Project: On The Right Track
Location: Brazil
Target group: Truck Drivers protecting Children who are at risk of abuse

The program is supported by companies to the Corporate Pact Against Sexual Exploitation of Children and Adolescents on Brazilian Highways, a public commitment to protect children from sexual exploitation. The main strategy of the program is the ongoing education of truck drivers to act as protection agents for children’s rights, by reporting suspected or confirmed situations of sexual exploitation.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

Network for Protection

Organization: SSCAR
Project: Network for Protection
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children’s rights

The SSCAR coordinates and integrates civil society and government public authorities when applying normative rulings and triggering the mechanisms of promotion, defense, and control to make children and adolescents’ rights effective in Federal, State, City, and District levels.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

The Communication Program

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: The Communication Program
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children who are at risk of abuse and exploitation

The Communication Program aims to increase the outreach and influence of Childhood by mobilizing, educating and informing society on Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

Support to Community Based Programs

Organization: Childhood Brazil
Project: Support to Community Based Programs
Location: Brazil
Target group: Children who are victims of abuse

Childhood provides support to NGOs in Brazil (Non-government organizations) and aims to initiate change and propel progress within communities.

Read more: childhood@childhood.org.br


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

Sweden

Big Sister Webcam

Organization: Tjejzonen
Project: Big Sister Webcam
Location: Online, Sweden
Target group: Children who are victims of abuse

Childhood helped fund the very popular and academically evaluated online chat resources for at-risk girls, which Tjejzonen developed and continues to run. The project Big Sister Webcam is an evolution driven by the needs and wishes expressed by girls at risk. It combines anonymous chat communication addressing difficult issues with face to face mentorship bonding via webcams.

Read more: www.tjejzonen.se

Contact person at Childhood:
Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org

Say What You Saw

Project: Sag yad du sag (Say What You Saw) Initiative

Location: Malmö, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse, Street children, Children in alternative care

In 2018, Childhood, with support from the Swedish Postcode Lottery, launched a new initiative to reduce the opportunities for Swedish offenders to abuse children in foreign countries. The Säg vad du såg (“Say what you saw”) project is conducted together with Ecpat, the Swedish Police and the Swedish Gender Equality Agency. “Usually, we work directly with children and families to reduce the risk of violence and abuse. But we also need to focus on the offenders: those who travel to sexually abuse children. As offenders change their travel patterns and methods, our initiatives also need to be updated. In this project, we are doing exactly that,” says Joel Borgström, program manager at Childhood and project head for Say what you saw.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org


Trauma in Children-A Handbook

Project: Trauma in Children-A Handbook

Location: Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse, Children in alternative, Street children

“Trauma in Children – A Handbook” (Swedish: “Traumatisering hos barn – en handbok”) provides readers with the knowledge and tools to discover, assess and treat trauma in children and their families. An abundance of case studies and dialogues bring the content to life and help to create an understanding of a complex subject.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org


Hidden in the Park

Organization: University of SKÖVDE

Project: Hidden in the Park

Location: Online, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse, Children who are at risk of abuse

Researchers at the University of Skövde have developed an interactive board game – Parkgömmet (translates as Hidden in the Park) –  for primary school children. The foundation Change Attitude came up with the idea to let children learn how to navigate risks online through playing a game. Parkgömmet is a physical board game making use of augmented reality through a tablet or smartphone. Each player hides a treasure and there are clues to help them find the hidden treasures. The players have to keep the clues safe so that no one else can find the treasure. But there are chat messages from an unknown player which use different tactics to make the children reveal clues.

The developers at the University of Skövde had access to authentic chat logs from websites where children were contacted by strangers seeking sexual communication, which is unique. While the chat logs have been used to create the game, the actual game does not contain any scary or inappropriate content. However, the game events create a basis for follow-up discussions to raise children’s awareness of online risks. These discussions are led by a teacher or an educator. A prototype of the game has been tested on children with positive results.

Funding from Childhood is being used to complete the game and for research into how the game can be used in the classroom. The goal is that the game can be used in schools, together with teacher-led classroom discussion. Today the game and accompanying methodological material is a collaborative effort between Change Attitude, the University of Skövde and World Childhood Foundation.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org


Safer Society

Organization: Safer Society

Location: Online, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse

According to police estimates, 15,000 people in Sweden alone downloaded images of child abuse from the Internet in 2016. Organizations that document the number of websites that link to material portraying sexual abuse of children report that the number may be more than a hundred thousand per year. This figure does not include the sites that are hidden on the dark web, meaning sites that cannot be reached using search engines such as Google.

When the police seize images of child abuse, enormous amounts of material are often involved – a single case may contain hundreds of thousands of images and thousands of hours of videos. With such enormous amounts of material to review, the police must decide at an early stage which hard drives, folders and files are to be investigated first, a process that is currently extremely demanding in terms of resources. Childhood is now financing a pilot project in which our partner Safer Society is working to develop software that can help the police to prioritize cases at an early stage and quickly identify vulnerable children and suspected perpetrators. The goal is for this to become a tool for police globally, which will help them to find the right material and thus be able to come to children’s rescue more swiftly.

Read more: https://www.safersociety.org/

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org


Reach

Organization: Department of Women and Children’s Health, Uppsala University

Project: Reach

Location: Uppsala, Sweden

Target group: Women and children at risk

REACH is a multidisciplinary research group at the Department of Women and Children’s Health at Uppsala University that is working to improve women and children’s health in Sweden and internationally. The research aims to develop methods that can help professionals promote children’s health, prevent ill health, and identify problems at an early stage, making it possible to offer appropriate help and action. The “Barnsäkert” project is a collaboration between REACH and the central child healthcare organizations in Uppsala and Dalarna, and is being funded by Childhood. Barnsäkert’s mission is to test and evaluate the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model to see whether it can effectively contribute to preventing child abuse by identifying early psychosocial risk factors in the child’s home environment and providing relevant support and assistance to the family. Selected child healthcare centers in Dalarna county will use the SEEK screening form when parents are visiting and, when necessary, refer them for the right support and assistance.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org

Vilda Says No!

Project: Vilda Says No!

Location: Online, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse or at risk

Vilda Says NO! is a book that provides children with information about integrity and the right to their own body. It teaches children to put into words the various parts of the body and different feelings, and to talk about things that do not feel good. Vilda Says NO! was first published in 2006, with support from Childhood. We are now financing a reprint of the book and thereby helping to make the book available to new generations of children, parents, preschool classes and teachers.

Talking about abuse with small children is difficult and distressing for many. But we know that silence is the perpetrator’s best friend, and it allows abuse to continue.

Teaching children that they can and may say “no” to adults when something does not feel good is important, but this is never enough – the responsibility for preventing abuse must never be placed on a child. How we adults act and the signals we give are even more important. Vilda Says NO! also serves as a textbook for adults when it comes to respecting children’s boundaries in small everyday ways.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org

Maskrosbarn

Organization: Maskrosbarn

Location: Stolkholm, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse

Maskrosbarn is a non-profit organization founded in 2005. Its main aim is to support children and young people with parents suffering from addiction or mental illness. The employees at Maskrosbarn all have personal experience from growing up with addiction or mental illness. Maskrosbarn’s activities aim to help young people become more resilient and to reduce the feeling of isolation and disgrace and instead offer positive life experiences and a feeling of belonging.

For six years, Childhood has supported Maskrosbarn’s summer camps for more than 100 young people aged 14-19, who all have parents suffering from addiction or mental illness. Maskrosbarn also organizes events on Friday evenings as well as Christmas and autumn-break camps and offers personal coaches who support the young people in their daily lives and their contacts with the authorities. Childhood has now established a new cooperation with Maskrosbarn. Its aim is to test an alternative for children and young people who need immediate placement, filling a gap before a contact family, foster family or family home has been identified. This placement will be drawn up entirely by children and young people who have personal experience of these types of situations. New methods are rarely designed by people who are directly affected, so Childhood sees this as a highly innovative and important initiative. It is hoped that this method can contribute to reducing the number of unsuccessful placements, but above all to increasing the number of successful placements where children and young people fare better.

https://www.maskrosbarn.org/

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org

Prevent It

Organization: Anova

Project: Prevent It

Location: Stolkholm, Sweden

Target group: Children who are victims of abuse or at risk

ANOVA, Karolinska University Hospital (KS), is an assessment and treatment clinic for andrology, sexual medicine and trans medicine/gender dysphoria that conducts research in the same areas. The overall aim of ANOVA’s work is to contribute to better health among patients with medical problems relating to sexual and reproductive health and to prevent sexual abuse and violence. ANOVA is also responsible for Preventell, a helpline for unwanted sexuality – read more at preventell.se. ANOVA has several research projects that are aimed in various ways at preventing sexual abuse of children.

The objective of the Prevent_IT research project is to test whether CBT treatment with the support of a psychotherapist over the Internet is an effective treatment model for people who view documented child sexual abuse.  The method is based on experience from earlier research results in projects associated with ANOVA (Kafka_IT and Priotab) and from clinical experiences from Preventell. The project also gathers experience and knowledge of the target groups that may be of help in the continuing effort to find effective ways of preventing child sexual abuse.

Contact person at Childhood:

Britta Holmberg
britta.holmberg@childhood.org

Poland

Workshops and Seminars for Fathers

Organization: Empowering Children Foundation
Project: Workshops and Seminars for Fathers
Location: Warszawa, Poland
Target group: Fathers at risk

Through father groups and seminars on parenthood for fathers – particularly for those at risk – the foundation offers support for fathers to help them become more engaged in bringing up children free from violence. The project is based on international experience and provides fathers with the knowledge of their positive role in the lives of their children and the importance of an equal sharing of parental responsibility. The long-term aim is to reduce child abuse in families at risk.

Read more: https://fdds.pl/

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

The Barnahaus Project

Organization: Comenius Foundation for Child Development
Project: Empowering Children Foundation
Location: Warszawa, Poland
Target group: Families at risk

A Barnahus is a child-friendly location where social workers, the police, doctors and psychiatrists can work with children who are victims of crime and abuse. All specialists are trained in helping children and their immediate family. The Barnahus model means that children do not need to tell their story several times to different people. It also offers children help in a single location.


Read more: http://www.frd.org.pl/en

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg(a)childhood.org

Belarus

Voluntas

Organization: Voluntas
Location: Gomel, Belarus
Target group: Families at risk

The project is developing a preventive model that supports families at risk of having their children taken into care and placed in a foster family or an institution. Support is offered by a mentor family that has previously been in a similar situation. Each family also receives support from a group of specialist psychologists and social workers who offer both individual and group support.

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Moldova

AMICUL – Child Friendly Service for Abused Children

Organization: National Center for Child Abuse Prevention (NCCAP)
Project: AMICUL – Child Friendly Service for Abused Children
Location: Chisinau, Moldova
Target group: Children who are victims of abuse

The NCCAP trains social workers, teachers, psychologists, physicians, the police, judges and prosecutors on subjects related to child abuse and its prevention. The NCCAP has operated the AMICUL Center, which provides treatment, social assistance, and legal and medical advice to children and families.

Read more: www.cnpac.org.md

Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Alternative Family-Based Care in Moldova

Organization: Partnership for Every Child Moldova
Project: Alternative Family-Based Care in Moldova
Location: Moldova
Target group: Children in alternative care

P4EC is an organization that works with children who are either at risk of being, or who have already been, placed in a foster family/institution. P4EC has different types of operations in Moldova, including shelters for mothers and babies who, for various reasons, need support from personnel for a period of their lives to prevent the child from being placed in care.The project aims to implement a parenting support program in Moldova with the goal of providing parents with better foundation for bonding with their children and providing them with emotional security, well-being and developmental support. The target group is children aged 0-5 who risk abandonment or being placed in care after birth and in their first few years of life.

Read more: www.p4ec.md

Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org

Smile Support for Migrants’ Children

Organization: DCCCE
Project: Alternative Family-Based Care in Moldova
Location: Moldova
Target group: All children

The aim of the Alternative Family-Based Care in Moldova is to open an activity center with recreational activities to give the children a chance to have a safe place to be after school, where they can also receive help and support. The idea is that the children will learn about children’s rights, become motivated to continue studying, and have their identity and self-confidence boosted in order to reduce some of the risk factors for abuse and strengthen the children’s resistance

Contact person at Childhood:
Ulrikah Reihs
ulrikah.reihs@childhood.org