Ukraine

Ukraine

Fulcrum

Organization: Fulcrum
Location: Ukraine
Target group: LGBTQ+ persons

Fulcrum works to ensure that all LGBTQ+ persons have the same rights and obligations as everyone else in Ukraine. Due to homophobia and discrimination, young LGBTQ persons in Ukraine run a higher risk of being subjected to violence and sexual exploitation as well as suffering from mental illness. The goal of the project is for young LGBTQ persons in Kiev to receive high-quality and non-discriminatory help at the city’s family and youth centers. The centers’ employees will learn to work better with such vulnerable groups as young LGBTQ people. Communication channels, including online alternatives, will be developed. Fulcrum will also establish networks comprising various organizations, who collectively can better reach out and help the target groups. The project also includes activities with parents to help them provide support for their children.

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Liga

Organization: Liga
Location: Odessa and Kiev
Target group: LGBTQ+ persons

The goal of the project is for young LGBTQ people in Odessa and Kiev to receive assistance from school psychologists. School psychologists will undergo training to be able to meet and help young LGBTQ people in a supportive and non-discriminatory manner. The project will also provide the target audience with consultations online or by phone.
More info: liga.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Partnership for Every Child

Organization: Partnership for Every Child
Location: Ukraine
Target group: At risk children

With help from Childhood, Partnership for Every Child has developed a model where children in acute need of shelter are placed with a short-term foster family. A number of regions have adopted the model, which is now also funded by local authorities. In those regions where the model has yet to be introduced, children are placed in hospitals and institutions pending formal decisions by the authorities on whether the children should return to their families or be placed in care. Almost all of the children that have been placed with a short-term foster family have avoided ending up in an institution, and have either returned to their families, been adopted or been placed with a long-term foster family. In addition to developing the short-term foster family model, the project also introduced necessary legislative changes and funding mechanisms.

Other children, including those whose parents suddenly pass away or require emergency hospital care, will now be able to avoid being placed in an orphanage. It will also be possible for the large group children who are currently living as internal refugees after being sent away by their parents due to the crisis in eastern Ukraine to legally be placed in the temporary care of relatives. The project aims to educate trainers who, in turn, will prepare hundreds of short-term foster families across Ukraine. The social services are working in parallel with the local authorities to recruit families and to change routines to ensure children are no longer placed in institutions, and to build up support for vulnerable families.
More info: p4ec.org


Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org

Blaho

Organization: Blaho
Location: Uzhgorod, Ukraine
Target group: At risk groups

Blaho was started in 2003 and initially offered mostly practical and material support for vulnerable groups in western Ukraine (Transcarpathia). Blaho works with the most vulnerable groups in the area, namely Roma children and their families. The organization helps them gain access to healthcare and housing and, since 2014, with the right to education. The majority of Roma in Transcarpathia live below the poverty line and most have dropped out of school. Many live in slums where violence, addiction and unemployment is widespread.

One of the key factors when it comes to integrating into society and obtaining a better future is to compete school education, but for many children, discrimination, stigma, language barriers and a lack of support from home means they drop out of school very early, which is particularly true for girls. Few children from the Roma population go to preschool, partly because of the discrimination they are subjected to, but costs and inadequate language skills also have a strong impact. There are no preschools with specialist competence in Roma issues in Uzhgorod (where about 5,000 Roma live).

Using financing from Childhood, Blaho established a preschool unit for Roma children in April 2014. In the first six months, 22 children attended. Today, 40 children attend the unit and Blaho works with 50 parents.

Contact person at Childhood:
Susanne Drakborg
susanne.drakborg@childhood.org